MOVEMENT

Bill Haury to replace Fred Horowitz in the Family Division.

The new appointment from the crop of candidates currently up before Rick Scott to replace Haury in Criminal.

Kim Mollica to full time First Appearances.  Michael Davis takes over for Mollica in County Criminal.

The First Appearances/Davis swap is old news, while the Haury move is a strong, fresh rumor.  Mike Rothschild had been in the running to take over Horowitz’s division in Family, but it appears he may have to wait until the promised new full time Family Division is created.

Developing …

121 thoughts on “MOVEMENT”

    1. 4

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      No mere rumor. Incumbent judges are in for a real rocky ride. . Several will be following Destry in his attempts to remake himself after getting tossed off the bench by voters.
      Bring it on. These smooches need to be shown the door.

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    Gotta love Bill’s enthusiasm over new gossip:

    “…now this is a strong, fresh rumor!!”

    Sad to be known not as a lawyer but as the local gossip monger.

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      That gives him credibility as a person.
      This country was built and maintained with gossip.
      “The British are coming”, was also gossip.
      And throwing snow balls at Red Coates, was assaults on LEO’s.

      So you see, its all about retrospectives.
      If you are an attorney, you should already know this.

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        Don’t you remember ? Lit’l Howie doesn’t endorse judicial candidates. Just offers criticism of them.
        Although lately he’s been uncharacteristicly quiet.
        Things are not what they may seem.

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            Why wouldn’t he endorse Betsy? It made perfect sense. He gets rid of a lawyer that never won any cases- and he gets to look like the hero. Win-win. Betsy is a better judge than she was a lawyer. She treats everyone well and doesn’t have black robe fever. But let’s face it- she was a joke as a trial attorney.

            1. 4

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              I didn’t see her much as a lawyer so I cannot pass judgement but in general lousy lawyers make good jurists because they don’t have to advocate.

    1. 1

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      Tanner hands down is one of the best trial lawyers in the PDO. Gordon is lucky Tanner is not running against him for PD.

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        Tanner is the man that all the capital lawyers run to for advice on DNA and other complicated issues and procedural concerns. He deserves this position.

        1. 4

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          This is true.
          That’s why Judge Howard Coates, allows me to do the Voo Doo I do so well.

          As a Court Contractor, First you have to finagle a blank police form, Then fill it in as a Police Officer, then pawn it off on a Court Clerk (coworker), who then fills the narratives, (UPL), and procedes to stamp a FL> seal to validate the venue shopping to the coworker Judge Howard Coates.

          And poof. done.
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9quSMSit7o

          Have Blank Police Letterhead, Will Travel.

            1. 3

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              Yes, our enterprise is too profitable.
              We in The 15th. circuit have no problems validating forged, altered, and redacted documents for our fraudulent contractors.

  2. 9

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    I hear Brenda is toast next time up. Phase one of the thrust to remove her come next election time is going on before Mark Speiser. There are disgusting photos and Brenda is grasping at straws. The only question is who will the establishment decide on to be the candidate. It should be someone qualified this time. Howard didn’t deserve this but he bares some blame for putting her in in the first place.

    1. 12

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      HOWARD FOREMAN DESERVES ALL THE BLAME
      HE AND HIS TURD STERN WHO BOTH HELPED TO GET THIS TOTAL FRAUD IN THERE AS CLERK

      HOWARD WAS BAD ENOUGH AS CLERK
      THE CLERKS OFFICE WAS POORLY ADMINISTERED
      HOWARD STUNK AS CLERK
      HE NEVER DID ANYTHING TO IMPROVE THE ABILITY OF COMPLETE MORONS TO DO THE SIMPLEST OF TASKS
      NEVER UPGRADED A COMPLETELY OUTDATED COMPUTER SYSTEM TO ACCOMMODATE CITIZENS

      APPARENTLY HE COULDNT EVEN KEEP IT IN HIS PANTS

      HE SHOULD HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR A NURSE

      UNTIL HE FINALLY FIGURED OUT HE WAS PLAYED BIG TIME BY A BIMBO DID HE START WITH HIS ATTACKS AGAINST BRENDA

      ASK THE SPEEZ THE LAST TIME HE WAS IN MOSCOW AND IF HE GOT LUCKY

      RUSSIAN GIRLS ARE TOUGH CUSTOMERS
      THEY WANT TO SEE THE GREENBACKS ON THE TABLE FIRST

  3. 0

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    An ASA sends an office wide email saying “puke” to mandatory sexual harassment training at the SAO. Does that office do anything at all? I bet the answer is no.

    1. 0

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      Why would they? They didn’t do anything about an office wide email that an ASA sent chastising another ASA for reporting such conduct.

        1. 12

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          You can bet if the bimbo was man hunting that Countryman wasn’t her target. He’s an anachronistic holdover from the days when Neanderthals still roamed Northern Europe sometime before the close of the last Glacial Age.
          There’s a reason they went extinct …

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            Funny, I’ve never thought of John as an arbiter of fashion … his suits smell like they haven’t been dry cleaned since he’s worked for Satz.
            Maybe she’s just not his type.

            1. 6

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              The guy does stink if you’ve ever been unfortunate enough to get caught on an elevator with him, but it’s his lost in the fog look and intermittent brain freeze that’s a good deal more concerning.

            1. 7

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              If you’re going to go on a bimbo hunt in the SA’s Office, there’s no shortage of prey. It’s like traveling thru the Serengeti during the rainy season.

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                It’s true. It’s pretty astounding just how many bimbos there are in the State Attorney’s office. Many examples of bimbos that look like they have a second job at a stripper bar. They better keep both jobs though.

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            WE DONT HAVE TO TAKE THIS ABUSE
            WE REPRESENT A VIABLE AND PRODUCTIVE PART OF THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
            WAIT UNTIL WE HAVE THE FIRST FEMALE PUBLIC DEFENDER
            YOU WONT BE LAUGHING THEN

      1. 3

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        Well the ‘chastised’ asa couldn’t have felt too bad about the office ignoring the email since she tucked her tail between her legs and went back after abandoning her private practice associate, paralegal, and secretary.

    2. 14

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      Mandatory sexual harassment training at that office? The office where the head hits on female attorneys a third of his age and the (former) head of CCU spends 8 hours a day with his half his age girlfriend in his office. This will be the funniest training ever!

      1. 10

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        Would you like me to weigh in on this topic? I am knowledgeable about various topics and am told I make a mean baklava …

    3. 15

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      Put Tony Loe in charge sexual harassment training. He’s got lots of experience and has been lauded by the Pope.

    1. 8

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      How did this woman ever get elected as Clerk of Courts ? Watch what you wish for Howard. In this case it’s turned around to bite you in the ass, not quite what you expected.
      ONLY IN BROWARD WHERE THE NAME GAME IS USED CONSISTENTLY BY UNSCRUPULOUS POLITICOS TO DUPE UNSUSPECTING VOTERS
      THOUGHT IT MIGHT PUT SOME MORE CASH IN YOUR POCKET AFTER YOUR RETIREMENT WITH YOUR ALREADY HEFTY RETIREMENT PACKAGE

      YOU GOT BAGGED BRO

      DEMENTIA? MAYBE
      STUPID ? DEFINITELY

      1. 1

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        Ask that slime filter fish Stern and Howard how this kink got into office. They did everything they could do to insure it and now they want to ditch the bitch.
        They should all be flushed down the drain for good.

    2. 0

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      Brenda has lied from day one. She is one of the most DISRESPECTED creatures that have walked into the BCJC.

      Some people run and hide because she’s so nasty. Others don’t give her the time of day.

      People who have worked with her when she was a littler nothing now must call her Mrs. Forman. WTF is that about?

      May she get her potty flushed soon, without any toilet paper

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    Working for Satz and Destry should have been enough to disqualify her. Lol. Reminds me of another talker Miriam Olafont who was equally as much a breastbeater before she screwed up so bad she had to be removed by the Gov. Thanks Howard. You weren’t incompetent enough over sixteen years of doing nothing but soaking taxpayers. Now you’ve left us with this turkey and you don’t even want her anymore as your wife !

  5. 20

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    Looks like Howard chose himself a real voodoo doll hes dealing with. That alone should make a good argument for the guy having lost his marbles. Brenda may have been on to something there!
    But then to make her Clerk of the Courts ??? WTF

    1. 19

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      There’s no town like Pound Town (Broward) when it comes to its sleazy judges or in this instant case, the sordid details of The Clerk of Courts and the machinations of such people and the scandalous ways they behave. But this one takes the cake for its abundantly apparent gross drama, at least this month.
      Broward Courts seem to get hit with another scandal every couple of months or so. It’s like a bunch of crabs scuttling across the sand.
      Face the fact that sleazy politics is a way of life involving our courts as we have repeatedly seen.
      Judge Robinson and political operatives such as M. Ahearn are about to find out that things don’t stay secret forever and there’s a price to pay beyond pocket change for engaging in Pay to Play Practices.
      One thing is for sure:
      If Broward Courts are ever to clean up their acts, it’s going to take outside intervention.

    2. 0

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      Actually was an Ayn Rand disciple but then she openly boned her underling Nathaniel Brandon & made some dumb argument about why it was o.k. Kept her husband in the closet, poor guy. But he dined regularly on her $$.

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        Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water.
        Its fallacious to throw out solid validity, she made some great points, and had first hand knowledge to draw from.

        If only our attorneys had the heart to do the right thing.

          1. 11

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            Williams would be great, once she removes her gator size mouth from her buffalo size ass. Perhaps then she’ll be able to taste the truth.

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                Prepare? You’ll never find me indigent in Broward.
                Her at the PD’s would create the largest zest pool of confidential informants to LE
                in The Whole World. Data supports this.

                If she sells out paying clients, then I can only imagine what she’ll do to the powerless.

                Who else is running?

  6. 9

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    Pound Town has always been about the lazy and stupid telling everyone else to ‘do as I say and not as I do’ in between pig snorts.

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    Parasites mooching off the government dime need successful people to pay the filing fee too. Outrageous. These Moochers couldn’t even crack 100k without court appointments so they wrangle a robe because they have so much free time due to pucker up all over Pound Town due to a lack of demand for their professional services. Then they have the nerve to act rude to their superiors in court because of inferiority complexes wider than the Euphrates that are exacerbated every 6 years when they have to go begging and scraping like bums to keep their cruddy paying jobs. To think the big contributors don’t get treated nicer in court is to think breakfast is served at 6:00 at night and dinner is served at 7:30 in the morning.

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      I know this is not going to sound intuitive, but its the only way.
      And it’s common sense.

      Vote only non-Florida Bar Members to the bench.

  8. 0

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    Put the seat up for auction. Verified personal funds only. A half mil liquid to participate. The funds from the auction are then used to fund rehab programs.

    1. 8

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      That would definitely narrow the field. Most of these schleps don’t have two nickels to rub together. That’s why they’re attracted to the gravey train in the first place.

    1. 0

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      SLEEPWALKER. DIDNT STOP HER FROM SHOWING UP TO WORK ON DRUGS. OF COURSE SHE MET WITH A FEW BUMPS ON HER WAY TO THE BENCH
      SHE SHOULD SUE HER PLASTIC SURGEON
      MORGAN FAIRCHILD SHE IS NOT
      SHE WAS ALSO ONE OF THE DUMBEST JUDGES IN BROWARD
      THATS SAYING SOMETHING CONSIDERING HOW MANY DUMB JUDGES WEVE GOT

    2. 3

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      Being a Broward judge has certain perks. It’s a part time job with no oversight and you can hit the juice as long as it’s done before you take the bench.

  9. 1

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    “Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. Cool it with a baboon’s blood, Then the charm is firm and good.“

  10. 0

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    Thought she had found Prince Charming right in the middle of a First Degree Murder trial. But that pesky JQC ruined everything in the end.
    The side effects of too much Spanish Fly ?

  11. 0

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    Decided to flip for an older model instead. Tried and true and he kept her pension. That’s gotta say something about true luv ❤️

  12. 5

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    CALLING FOR A COMPLETE INVESTIGATION INTO BROWARD JUDGES AND THE PAY TO PLAY SCHEMES UNDERMINING JUSTICE
    CALLING FOR THE PERMANENT REMOVAL OF JUDGE ROBINSON FROM THE BENCH
    CALLING FOR COMPLETE BAR INVESTIGATION INTO MICHAEL AHEARN
    CALLING FOR EXPLANATION FROM CHEIF JUDGE AS TO HIS LACK OF ACTION
    CALLING FOR REMOVAL FROM THE BENCH OF JUDGE JOEL LAZARUS
    CALLING AS TO WHY HOWARD FINKELSTEIN THE PUBLIC DEFENDER IS NOTHING BUT HOT AIR AND HIS REASONS FOR NOT PROTECTING THE CITIZENS OF BROWARD FROM THE CORRUPTION PERMEATING OUR JUDICIAL SYSTEM AND THE ADDRESS OF SAME
    CALLING FOR THE STATE ATTORNEY MICHAEL J. SATZ TO DO HIS JOB AND BRING CRIMINAL CHARGES AGAINST THESE FRAUDS UPON THE PUBLIC
    CALLING FOR THE FBI TO STEP IN AND CLEAN UP THE BROWARD JUDICIARY
    CALLLING FOR AN OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE TO MONITOR SCHEDULES OF BROWARD JUDGES AND UNDERGO A COMPLETE AUDIT OF ALL BROWARD JUDGE’S COURT APPOINTMENTS

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    Public Defenders Blend Law and Social Work to Reduce Crime
    For public prosecutors, their duty is to seek justice.

    The docket is full.

    It’s 10:05 a.m. in Courtroom 2B in the Leon County Courthouse. Deputies lead five men wearing green jail garb into the room and toward a bench off to one side.

    They are hunched, because wearing shackles attached by chains to handcuffs requiring them to advance only by tiny steps.

    They take seats and wait for the proceedings to begin.

    Second Judicial Circuit Judge Martin Fitzpatrick takes the bench. One by one, the accused stand before him, flanked by one of the two assistant public defenders in court today — John Knowles and Elizabeth Vallejo.

    Most are here to enter plea bargains or settle on court dates.

    One, awaiting trial on charges of beating up his girlfriend, seeks relief from a restraining order. (Having found she is pregnant, she wants contact; Fitzpatrick doesn’t think that’s wise and says no.)

    Another day in the life of a public defender.

    “You really have to love humanity,” said 2nd Circuit Public Defender Andy Thomas, who took office in January 2017.

    He supervises 65 staff attorneys, including 23 who work exclusively on appeals, plus social workers, investigators and support staff.

    The circuit’s 42 trial attorneys cover six counties: Leon, Jefferson, Gadsden, Liberty, Wakulla and Franklin, while the appeals attorneys cover 32 counties from Escambia to Duval to Alachua.

    The office shares the Leon County Courthouse’s fourth floor with the 2nd Circuit State Attorney’s Office.

    The Public Defender’s office represents 80-85 percent of the accused in circuit court in Leon County — the ones who can’t afford a private attorney who might charge $5,000 to handle, say, a DUI.

    “The key question when you’re hiring a young attorney is, ‘Do you really want to help poor people? Do you get poor people? Do you understand what indigent defense is?’”

    Thomas said in a recent interview.

    “You’re going to see some of the nastiest, most depressing, unhappy things in this job. And you’re going to have clients who will yell at you at times because they are maybe mentally ill, maybe jonesing, coming off of drugs. This is not an easy job. It takes some internal fortitude to do this job.”

    It helps to take a broad view of criminal defense — to see the client as a complex human being, often with serious problems you need to identify and address. Thomas calls himself “half social worker/psychologist, half lawyer.”

    This is the “holistic approach,” pioneered locally by Thomas’ predecessor as public defender, Nancy Daniels. Thomas joined Daniels’ office in 2000 and was her chief assistant for nearly 15 years.

    In 1992, Daniels and then-Chief Judge Philip Padovano instigated the creation of a drug court — only the third to operate in Florida.

    These courts closely supervise drug defendants, making sure they take drug tests, attend counseling sessions and visit court frequently.

    Participants who stay clean can win dismissal or reduction of charges. Failure brings immediate repercussions — a night behind bars, for example. But judges also act as cheerleaders, encouraging participants to succeed.

    “It’s more of an emphasis on trying to help the individual and provide therapy and rehabilitation. They expect a relapse. If you’re a drug addict, they know you’re going to use,” said Joel Remland, a retired assistant public defender.

    “It’s not a punitive court. It’s a compassionate court.”

    The logic wasn’t clear to everyone at the time, but even Willie Meggs, then the 2nd Circuit state attorney and no coddler of criminals, became a fan. The program was extended to cover juveniles, veterans and people with mental illness — although the mental health court has languished for lack of money.

    “It’s not just a slap on the wrist,” Daniels said in an interview in the offices of the Florida Association of Public Defenders, where since her retirement she analyzes legislation and writes talking points.

    “It’s actually much harder. They work. The recidivism rates have held up very well.”

    Community mental health resources can’t keep up with the demand.

    Thomas has added a social worker — bringing the total to three — to identify people who commit minor crimes because of untreated mental illness.

    One-third of the people held in jail are on psychotropic drugs.

    “They don’t necessarily need to be in jail. They need to be somewhere where they have food to eat and somebody making sure they take their meds,” Daniels said.

    It might be easy to mistake these initiatives as soft on crime, but Daniels won’t have it.

    “When people get the services they need, they don’t commit crimes so much,” she said.

    “If you just put them in jail for a little while and let them out without any services provided, they’re going to keep doing the same things. If you make an effort to give them treatment for the thing that brought them there, you’re interrupting the cycle of crime. You’re helping society and you’re helping the criminal justice system.”

    State Attorney Jack Campbell, the 2nd Circuit’s chief prosecuting officer, is convinced the holistic approach reduces recidivism.

    “I think it’s great. We look at them as complete human beings, and not just as a summary of the charges or the incident,” he said.

    “If you’re putting the interests of your clients first, you need to recognize that we need to make them not get in trouble again — to make sure this is the only time they come to our office,” Campbell said.

    “Whether that’s addressing a substance abuse issue, poverty or employment, I think we’re all on the same page.”

    Initially, even some defense attorneys were skeptical about drug court, and the approach sometimes runs contrary to a defender’s instincts.

    What if a client desperately needs drug treatment, but the case deserves to be thrown out because of procedural error? What truly represents the client’s best interests?

    “There’s a lot of common ground between social services provision and legal representation. If there’s a way to help that person get out of the cycle of crime, great.

    But if it just comes down to legal representation, that always supersedes other things,” Daniels said.

    “The social worker’s disappointed because that person didn’t end up in a treatment program. The lawyer’s excited because their motion to suppress was granted and the case was dismissed.”

    PHOTO BY MARK WALLHEISER

    “The Florida Bar tells us that if you’re defending someone in a criminal case, they have the right to zealous representation — that we are to argue every arguable point within the bounds of law. For public prosecutors, their duty is to seek justice. Not convict people. Not put people in prison. Not win every case. Seek justice.”— Andy Thomas, 2nd Circuit Public Defender

    The pursuit of justice
    “The Florida Bar tells us that if you’re defending someone in a criminal case, they have the right to zealous representation — that we are to argue every arguable point within the bounds of law,” he said.

    “For public prosecutors, their duty is to seek justice. Not convict people. Not putting people in prison. Not in every case. Seek justice.”

    If prosecutors don’t think they have a case, Thomas said,“They ought to drop it. That doesn’t always happen, and we have to try those cases.”

    The fact is that fewer than 5 percent of the cases lodged locally go to trial.

    The rest settle through plea bargains.

    Daniels estimated that as many as 15 percent end in dismissal of charges.

    “You can’t set every case for trial. The dockets simply can’t accommodate it,” she said.

    “As it is now, cases that come through would typically be set for trial five or six months from now. That’s a very long time to have pre-trial incarceration. If the case drags on and on, it’s a hard situation. People have a lot of incentive to resolve their cases as soon as possible.”

    She added: “Most people, in my experience, prefer certainty to uncertainty. A jury trial is always uncertain.”

    The attorney-client relationship hinges on trust.

    “How are people on the street, using our services, going to trust us to advise them that that this is a good way to go — that this is a good disposition, or maybe you should go to a trial, or maybe you should take this deal — if they don’t know us?” Thomas said. “They don’t know us from Adam.”

    Thomas and others say the answer includes recruiting more minority attorneys and community outreach. For outreach, Thomas acquired $35,000 from the Florida Legislature for a van that will take volunteers into neighborhoods — to “take services where the people are,” he said.

    “If you have a case and you’re having a hard time getting to our office, come to see us (at the van). If you don’t have a case, you have a question, or you’re worried about warrants, we can give you free advice.”

    Daniels believes the approach pays off in community support — from the Leon County Commission; from Big Bend Community Based Care, the big social services provider; from the NAACP; from the ACLU. Activists learned the office would work with them when possible, she said.

    On the other hand, there’s the suspicion in some quarters that defense lawyers scheme to let the guilty go free.

    “Some prosecutors and some outside forces think that defense lawyers are just evil and that we would do anything in the world to get our clients off,” Daniels said. “It’s so untrue, because we operate under a code of ethics.

    “For one thing, we cannot nor would we ever want to allow a client to commit perjury. We cannot put forward false evidence. We cannot do anything that would demonstrate lack of candor to the court. The ethics are the floor — professionalism is way above that. There’s a lot you have to do to keep your license and to practice with professionalism.”

    While defenders and prosecutors often cooperate, elbows sometimes fly in the heat of a court fight.

    “In trial, it’s not unusual for things to get pretty visceral and personal, because these are incredibly important things,” Campbell said. “They’re fighting for a client who’s looking at possibly, sometimes, going to his death, or to spend the rest of their lives in prison. We’re fighting for victims who we care deeply about and want to protect. Definitely, sometimes things get chippy and adversarial.”

    Yet the two offices stage friendly competitions on the softball field, he said. And weddings between prosecutors and defenders are not unheard of.

    “Some of the best lawyers I’ve ever worked with are public defenders,” Campbell said. “I’ve seen outstanding results — and, believe me, I’m the one fighting against them.

    Often, they’re getting as good if not better representation from a public defender than they would from a private attorney.”

    PHOTO BY MARK WALLHEISER​

    “If you just put them in jail for a little while and let them out without any services provided, they’re going to keep doing the same things. If you make an effort to give them treatment for the thing that brought them there, you’re interrupting the cycle of crime. You’re helping society and you’re helping the criminal justice system.”— Nancy Daniels, Former Public Defender

    It’s not about the money
    Certainly, the motivation isn’t money — pay starts at around $40,000, and felony attorneys might earn $50,000 or more.

    For that, a misdemeanor defender may handle 150 cases at any given time, and a felony attorney between 40 and 80. “Which is a lot of serious cases to be juggling at the same time,” Daniels said.

    Turnover in the Public Defender’s office “can be 14 to 20 per- cent, depending on the year,” Thomas said.

    To help with retention, the new state budget increases the salaries of assistant public defenders and assistant state attorneys by $2,000 to $4,000 depending on years of service.

    Meanwhile, the system is increasingly strained with homicide cases.

    As of May, the Public Defender’s office was handling 14 murder cases circuit wide: 10 from Leon, four from outlying counties.

    “They’re coming in at an unprecedented rate,” Thomas said. The Public Defender’s office now has three lawyers working capital trials and one in capital appeals.

    Most people who need a public defender “have not hurt people,” he said. “So many come in broken and need help.”

    What deeply motivates defenders is “truly understanding how important it is that if we allow the government to infringe on the least of our citizens’ rights, that they will eventually infringe on ours,” Thomas said.

    “That’s the way every monarchy, fascist, whatever you want to call it, centralized government works when it wants to take over everything. First we’ll get rid of the gypsies. We’ll get rid of the blacks. We’ll get rid of these people or those people. We’ll go after the poor people first. We’ll go after their rights. We’ll suspend Fourth Amendment rights so we can stop your car for any reason,” he said.

    “If we’re not protecting our people from that, we’re not protecting the rest of you either.”

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