SAO UPDATE/CLOSURES

From FTU re depos:

We are requesting that LEO depos not be scheduled before June 8 so the LEA have a chance to set up their own processes. They can’t use any equipment that can also be used to access criminal justice data bases according to FDLE and they cannot mandate that officers use their personal devices so they are all diligently working to set up equipment that can be used for this purpose and they need a bit of time.

The email below was also sent to SAO employees earlier this afternoon titled Courthouse and Office Update.

As follows:

Good afternoon everyone, hopefully you are staying safe and well.

As most of you have heard by now, effective June 1st, the Clerk of Court will be opening their offices to the public for floors 1 thru 4 of the West Wing.

ONLY THE CLERK’S OFFICE IS OPENNING TO THE PUBLIC.

The West Wing first floor entrance will have separate security lines for the public and employees. The East Wing 3rd floor rotunda entrance is open to courthouse employees only. I have been asked to remind you that ALL staff coming into the courthouse must be wearing a mask.

Although the West Wing floors 1 thru 4 are accessible by the escalators, for ADA purposes (and in case of breakdowns) the first two elevators will be set aside for the public. The other 6 elevators may be used by courthouse staff.

THE SAO, PD AND OTHER COURTHOUSE OFFICES WILL NOT BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Current SAO staffing and alternating work schedules will continue as is. Courts will continue operating remotely and there will be no ‘in person’ court attendance. Evidentiary hearings or witness notices must refer to remote platforms via Zoom and not have a courthouse address.

Assistant State Attorney’s and staff must continue the preparations needed to support these court Zoom hearings and remote platforms.

Chief Judge Tuter will schedule meeting sometime mid-June to discuss future opening options and jurors.

Again, it is so important to maintain your social distancing, wearing of masks and frequently washing your hands.

ASAIC’s and Support Supervisor’s please make sure everyone in your units receive a copy of this message.

We will keep you updated as things progress. Stay safe everyone.

55 thoughts on “SAO UPDATE/CLOSURES”

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      Only a fool can deny the somber reality of the present …

      The practice of criminal law is made almost impossible by the bumbling ineptitude of incompetent leaders such as Tuter and Co.

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        It sure isn’t like it was in my day. I saw Michael Gottlieb’s financial disclosure for last year has only a $420,000 gross. After employees and other expenses are paid there’s not much left. He’s an excellent attorney too. I can’t imagine how badly others are suffering additionally now with the virus. I guess people like me should have appreciated more how good things were for my generation. I hope things work out for everyone.

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          Wow that’s less than what some of the favored SPD’s used to wrangle in a single year just from the wheel.

        1. 8

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          She got black coat syndrome & ain’t even a judge. Jeeeez. Hope to g-d she loses. Now is not the time for these types. Merit & pedigree do matter. We got a junkyard dog in office. But nice dress. Classy. She had her chance and squandered it.

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            She’s a nasty person too. On top of being unqualified and lacking in character. The place is seriously a mess because she listens to a select few who don’t have a clue half the time. And because she’s so nasty and incompetent many good people have left. The others walk on eggshells hoping she loses in November The IT department is such a joke! If she somehow wins more will look to leave because it’s an awful place to work.

        2. 5

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          MADAM CLERK – TREND SETTER AND CELEBRITY

          ONLY IN BROWARD COUNTY WHERE THE CARNIVAL KEEPS ON TRUCKING

              1. 0

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                WHICH IS MORE PATHETIC

                “LOVE AS LONG AS THE LOOT HOLDS OUT”
                OR
                “COULDNT KEEP UP THE BEAT”

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                  That’s how she got elected. Howard’s name. Not her own skills or character or intelligence because she’s seriously not qualified. And she puts people just as incompetent in charge

          1. 0

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            Geeze. She’s running around demanding “respect” and she’s a incompetent fool who should not be in that position. The dress would make a better clerk of court. Madame clerk!!?? There are no words for this complete ass.

  1. 1

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    Dang. I wonder what her biceps measure. She’s got a career with the carnival. Santa’s Forest left town with the carnies. But they’ll be back.

    1. 12

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      Mickey Mouse Ostrow’s ravings against wearing a face mask disrespects those who wear a mask to protect and respect others.

  2. 7

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    REMINDS ME OF BROWARD WHERE THERE IS NO LEADERSHIP IN THE RACE TO GET ON THE GRAVEY TRAIN

    ALL BROWARD JUDGES NEED TO BE VOTED FROM OFFICE
    MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD

    VOTE OUT INCOMPETENT INCUMBENTS

  3. 3

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    THE DAY OF JUDICIAL SHYSTERS HAS ARRIVED

    THERE ARE SO MANY PEOPLE RUNNING FOR JUDGE IN BROWARD I DONT KNOW WHO TO VOTE FOR

    ITS A CRAPSHOOT FOR OPPORTUNISTS

        1. 4

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          He shows for this. The editors from the newspaper would have asked him the tough questions about his JQC issues. These judicial butt sniffer Bar Associations wouldn’t dare.

      1. 0

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        IVE STILL GOT A TRUNK FULL OF THESE THINGS FROM THE LAST TIME
        BEING A BROWARD JUDGE SURE BEATS LIVING OUT OF YOUR CAR

        1. 0

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          There’s always two reasons a man does something: A good reason, and the real reason.
          Desperation is a good motivator.

  4. 3

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    All the Broward Court Zoom sessions being held this morning are severely lagging & randomly kicking everyone out of their respective sessions.

  5. 1

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    You think maybe you should fix those escalators since you’re bringing back hundreds of employees next week? So they don’t all have to ride in Covid elevators of doom?

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      Now that you are beginning hemodialysis, there may be many changes in your daily life. Your doctor has probably told you that you may need to make some changes in your diet.
      How well you feel will depend on:
      Eating the right kind and amounts of food.
      Having the hemodialysis treatments your health professional orders for you
      Taking the medicines your health professional orders for you.
      Your diet is an important part of your treatment. Your kidneys cannot get rid of enough waste products and fluids from your blood and your body now has special needs. Therefore, you will need to limit fluids and change your intake of certain foods in your diet. The kidney dietitian at your dialysis center will help you plan a diet for your special needs.

      You will need to:
      Eat more high protein foods.
      Eat less high salt, high potassium, and high phosphorus foods.
      Learn how much fluid you can safely drink (including coffee, tea, water, and any food that is liquid at room temperature).

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        Whether it’s a heart, lung, kidney or liver, many people assume that transplantation is a last resort in treating a failing organ.

        But in the case of kidney disease, transplantation is actually the first line of treatment for patients who are candidates to receive a new kidney.

        “A kidney transplant is not a last resort; it’s a first resort,” says nephrologist Emilio Poggio, MD, an expert in kidney transplantation. “For people who meet the requirements for kidney transplantation, it’s the best option for treatment.”

        But the scarcity of kidneys for transplantation makes the alternatives — hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis — much more common.

        Dialysis vs. kidney transplant
        Dialysis artificially does what healthy kidneys do. It pumps blood out of your body, cleans it and returns it to your body. Treatments are usually for three or four hours, three times a week.

        “Transplantation is the way to go, and the sooner the better,” says nephrologist Robert Heyka, MD, Chair of Nephrology in the Department of Hypertension and Nephrology. “But the reality is most people will still need to be on dialysis.”

        According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 10 percent of American adults – about 20 million people — have chronic kidney disease. Dr. Poggio says 600,000 are on dialysis and 100,000 are on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. Yet only 16,000 transplants are done each year.

        What you need to know
        Experts say you should know these four facts:

        1. Dialysis has both positives and negatives. Some of Dr. Heyka’s patients put off going on dialysis, but when they try it, they may find themselves pleasantly surprised.

        “People often say that they didn’t realize how bad they’d been feeling until they got treatment,” he says. “Within the first few months, their appetite is back, they’re gaining weight and they have more energy.”

        But the time commitment of dialysis treatments can limit a person’s independence and quality of life.

        2. Benefits of transplant outweigh the side effects. “There’s plenty of data that, despite the negatives of transplantation, the short-term and long-term outcomes are much better than those on dialysis,” says Dr. Poggio. “Their quality of life improves, they live better and longer.”

        In fact, a landmark 1999 study compared the health outcomes of patients on dialysis waiting for a transplant to those who had already received a new kidney. The study found the long-term mortality rate of transplant recipients was 48 to 82 percent lower than for those on dialysis.

        Of the 16,000 kidney transplants conducted in the U.S. every year, 30 to 40 percent come from living donors. Those transplants have greater success than transplants from cadavers.

        3. Not everyone can receive a transplant. Dr. Poggio considers many factors in deciding who is a candidate for a new kidney, including other medical conditions like diabetes and heart failure. But there are ways you can improve your candidacy.

        “Stay healthy and active,” he says. “Manage your conditions that might complicate a transplant — like smoking — and remain compliant with your medical therapies.”

        4. Choose your care wisely. Living well on dialysis depends on choosing the right location for your care. Social workers should provide support. Good communication among your healthcare providers is a key factor. And a positive atmosphere with social interaction among patients is also important.

        “Don’t be afraid to ask, ‘How often will I see my doctor? What are your rates for hospitalization? Will I see a nurse practitioner?’” says Dr. Heyka. “If you are in the right unit, you’ll get lots of support.”

        If you have kidney disease and currently on dialysis, don’t hesitate to talk to your doctor about a kidney transplant. Depending upon your individual situation, it could offer many benefits.

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          Waiting time can depend on factors such as:
          ABO (blood type). Blood type O has the longest wait. This is because blood type O donors can donate to other blood groups, but a patient with blood type O can only receive an organ from a donor with blood type O. Also, it has been found that those with blood type B tend to have longer wait times as well.
          Prior pregnancies, blood transfusions, or past transplants. These increase a substance in your body called antibodies. A higher level of antibodies in your blood can make it more difficult to match with a compatible donor.
          Changes to the US organ allocation system (2014) have impacted the way kidneys are allocated to patients. These changes to the waitlist have allowed some flexibility with the factors listed above. For example, donor matching is now done to more closely match the age of the donor and recipient. This means a kidney coming from a 30-year old donor will more likely go to someone in that age range. This is called longevity matching.

          Another big change that was made has to do with patients who joined the waitlist after being on dialysis. You now build wait-time from the time that you started dialysis- or from when it is documented that your GFR dropped to below 20.

          Finally, extra priority is now also given to patients who are extraordinarily hard to match because of having high levels of antibodies from prior transplants, blood transfusions or pregnancies.

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        I’VE ALWAYS EATEN WHATEVER I WANT AND THEN ASK FOR MORE
        IT’S ONE OF THE PERKS OF A BROWARD JUDGE
        HOPE THE SUPPLY CHAIN HOLDS OUT

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        Each transplant center sets its own guidelines for transplants. Some transplant centers may have restrictions or rules around age. Doing research will help you find the transplant center that fits your needs.

        There may be some medical conditions that affect the risk of transplant for you. An example of an issue that can affect your transplant candidacy is a current or recent cancer diagnosis. Speak with your transplant team to talk about future possibilities of getting a transplant after your cancer has cleared.

        Other factors that may affect transplant candidacy:
        Serious heart disease
        Not being healthy enough to survive an operation
        Active infection
        Obesity (being overweight)
        Smoking or substance abuse
        Each transplant center is different. Be sure to check with your transplant center to make sure you know of all of their procedures and rules.

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