COMPARE & CONTRAST: MIAMI v. BROWARD (DELTA BREAKTHROUGH EDITION)

MIAMI: via Rumpole today COVID ZOOM UPDATE

From Andrea Wolfson, Administrative Judge, Circuit Criminal Division, 11th Circuit:

This afternoon we had our weekly meeting of the Criminal Jury Trial Task Force. Based on the dire information that was provided by representatives from the State Attorney’s Office and Public Defender’s Office, I have decided to execute the attached amendment to the Administrative Memorandum regarding Hybrid Court Operations. It states as follows:

Effective immediately, ALL ATTORNEYS may choose to appear either in person or on Zoom. Each operating courtroom will continue to be staffed with an in person Assistant Public Defender, in addition to the judge, court clerk, bailiff, probation officer (optional) and correctional officer(s). Inmates will be brought to court only for hearings, trials, and very few pleas only with the judge’s express approval. As stated previously, if an inmate was not transported but wishes to accept a plea that will result in them getting out of custody, Corrections will bring them on Zoom on a staggered basis. If there is a surplus of inmate Zoom hearings on any one particular day, Judges Wolfson, de la O, and Tinkler Mendez will make themselves available to handle them. Interpreters will be appearing via Zoom unless needed for an in-person hearing, trial, or the types of pleas referenced above. As of this date, all other normal court operations will remain unchanged. (emphasis added)

In addition, for the judges – in the previous Administrative Memo where it advises people to mute their devices during Zoom proceedings, this does NOT apply to judges. You should have yourself on video and unmuted during your daily calendars, unless you go off the record for some reason.

Lastly, thank you all so much for your flexibility during this extremely difficult and challenging time. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time.

Best regards,

Andrea Ricker Wolfson

________________________________________________________________

BROWARD:

… Where having more than three in-custody Zoom links and in-custody Breakout Rooms still can’t be figured out seventeen months into the pandemic …

COMING SOON17th Circuit County Court Criminal Division: Is it beyond repair?

22 thoughts on “COMPARE & CONTRAST: MIAMI v. BROWARD (DELTA BREAKTHROUGH EDITION)”

    1. 6

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      I heard that Judge Usan is the one most adamant about making people come back in person, even for Calendar Calls.

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    The Judges sharing the excess is a good idea but it won’t work elsewhere because in Miami either a JA or a Bailiff always picks up the phone and makes sure matters are handled promptly whereas in WPB and Broward it’s impossible to get anyone on the phone plus there’s always an abundance of form over substance paperwork to file in Broward unlike other places.

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    County court in Broward is a joke right now. I seen a defendant specifically request for a Faretta inquiry AT their ARRAIGNMENT and the judge ( I wont say who)… refused to conduct Faretta, waived speedy trial (after the defendant told the judge NOT to), and than enter an order recusing themselves from the case…. This was more than a month ago…. I looked the case up moments ago and there is still NO new Judge assigned and NO new courtdate. That really speaks volumes about this division. Speedy Waived 🤦‍♂️🤣. Transcripts please.

    1. 11

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      Putting ASA Carpenter in charge has made things worse than before. It’s gridlock. The Baby Judges don’t know what to do. It’s dysfunction to the max. It’s good for business though.

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    Quite a difference from the clownshow here in Broward where the incompetence and laziness of our chief judge makes for a great example to all the other judges. We’ve got the laziest bunch of skaters known to the criminal justice system.

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    BROWARD JUDICIARY IS AN ABSOLUTE WRECK
    BUT I WANT TO HAVE A COMMEMORATIVE COURTROOM NAMED AFTER ME

  5. 6

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    I would like to know how any competent defense lawyer would agree to a jury trial where all potential jurors must wear masks .

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      Better to just let them languish in jail, so even if some alleged “good’ defense atty got them acquitted, Satz/Pryor still gets to keep their liberty for free. Imagine, sentenced to a yr and a day with 24 months credit time served— such a deal.

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    Wow. At end it directed the judges from blocking their faces during zoom hearings. And no muting etc. Wake up Broward these judges are pushing the limits of due process

  7. 6

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    Also tells judges to not block their faces during zoom hearings. And no muting etc. Wake up Broward these judges blocking their faces are a problem. And are pushing the limits of due process

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