64 thoughts on “JAABLOG NOW AN ELECTION ISSUE”

    1. 11

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      Correct. It’s embarrassing when telling other lawyers about being a Broward practitioner. The jokes are hurtful.

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    We understand but disagree with the special prosecutor on this manner.

    We all know this started over him taking her picture and her claim he needed her permission to do so.

    Any elected official knows that not to be true. In our opinion that was a malicious prosecution, and an abuse of stalking laws. Vote for anyone else Broward.

    https://southfloridacorruption.com/blog/2018/12/23/broward-clerk-of-court-files-malicious-prosecution-against-local-blogger/

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    She’s her own worst enemy.
    She got in on Forman’s largesse.
    Then she got busted by Judge Speiser for being dishonest.
    She screwed Forman over instead of being thankful.
    She didn’t thank her lucky stars for her job either.
    It must have been a $150,000 pay raise.
    She alienates many of her employees instead.
    She picks a fight with blog and looks dishonest again after videos.
    She deserves to be kicked out.
    I only wish a Black female would join the race to ensure her defeat and to hopefully keep a deserving Black female in a Constitutional Office since the Formans cancel each other out.

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  4. 19

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    The Clerk under the Foreman’s has been a disgrace worse then the short lived marrige. What a shame they’ve pulled on the people of Broward county. I’m assuming they are both backed by the bcpba professional Baker association. These fools are the Real atrocities. They are the ones pulling the strings. Reshape the bcpba these so called officer of the law are dangerous.

    1. 13

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      This putz is just looking to plug into her political base i.e. the black community and figures if he can tap it, it will carry over to him. It’s the same game played by anybody here seeking public office in Broward. Its all too apparent that Hassett is attempting to grease his own pole, but by the looks of his efforts will be launched on his own petard instead. He’s raised squat.
      Not very bright this punk and new to the political grease game.

  5. 17

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    She’s not fit to run. If she was just an uneducated loser… ok. If she had an ounce of civility she’d skate by & everyone would be happy an 8th grade dropout got a huge & powerful job with great benefits & the ability to appoint dozens of East 6 figure govt jobs. But, as many who have always been at the bottom because of lack of skill.. if they get any power it goes to their head. She truly believes this job is here. And she can be uppity to everyone. F her.

    1. 15

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      FACTS DO NOT CEASE TO EXIST BECAUSE THEY ARE IGNORED

      BRENDA FORMAN IS NOT COMPETENT TO BE CLERK AS SHOWN BY HER ACTIONS AND LACK OF QUALIFICATIONS AND THE PRESENT DEPLORABLE CONDITION OF THE CLERK’S OFFICE

      WHAT SHE DID BY USING HER HUSBAND’S NAME TO OBTAIN OFFICE IS PARAMOUNT TO COMMITTING FRAUD UPON VOTERS OF BROWARD IN THIS READER’S OPINION

      COURT RECORDS INDICATE SHE ATTEMPTED TO GAIN CONTROL OF HER FORMER HUSBAND’S WEALTH BY MEANS OF BAD FAITH CLAIMS AGAINST HIM

      SHE IS UNFIT TO RETAIN OFFICE AND WILL BE DEFEATED AT THE POLLS

      HER MISMANAGEMENT IN OFFICE AND INCOMPETENCE PREDICTS THIS TERM IN OFFICE WILL BE HER LAST

      IT IS INCONCEIVABLE THAT SHE WILL BE ABLE TO FOOL VOTERS ONCE AGAIN

      HER FORMER HUSBAND IS EVEN RUNNNG AGAINST HER TO RECLAIM HIS NAME AND REPUTATION

      BACKMAN IS RUNNING BECAUSE HE WILL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT FIRST AND HE’S NOT FINISHED SUCKING AT THE PUBLIC TROUGH AND WILL REMAIN TRYING UNTIL PIGS CAN FLY

      THIS TOWN NEEDS A GOOD FLUSH

      1. 4

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        The 1.980t form has been militarized, to protect officers of the courts favored by The Florida Bar. Its an epidemic.
        civil 1.980’s (a fairly new form), bypasses the jury.

        1. 5

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          The 12.980 t forms are meant to quash complaints from good citizens. Field Mc Connell currently in The BSO jail for exposing th truth.

          1. 8

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            THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSING AT PRECISELY THE CLOSE OF POLLING PLACES IN NOVEMBER

            PLEASE RETURN ALL BOOKS FROM WINCE THEY CAME AND VACATE THE PREMISES IMMEDIATELY

            SIGNED: PAULIE BACKPACK

  6. 17

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    The problem has always been the inbred nature of Broward politics.
    One has to be related to someone else already in office.
    That goes for appointment or for elections.
    It smells.

  7. 10

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    I always wondered why there isn’t more mentorship going on. For instance, couldn’t the Chief Judge of Miami or Palm Beach, places where things are professional, take Judge Tuter under their wing? To teach their methods of leadership that work so much better?? How about a Court of Appeals Justice doing the same. There is no Circuit or court system that is a blight on Florida like Broward. For decades. Is this an option or is there a legal impediment?

    1. 21

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      Things are too politically motivated here without much concern about bettering a thoroughly lacking judiciary in so many ways.

      Its a grab bag with networking with the other judges being the priority.
      The Chief Judge is probably more guilty than most judges of keeping it that way to insure they can circle the wagons every time one of them screws up, which has been seen repeatedly, become the norm among the 17th according to the number of judges that have been the subject of Judicial Qualifications Committee Inquires often resulting in removal from office for any number of reasons.

      The Chief Judges here concern themselves more with playing defense and getting re-elected to the position than they ever have to the administration of Justice.

      I’ve been an advocate for Judicial Rotation for many years like they have employed in so many other Circuits in the State, but Chief Judges here spend more time coddling, coming up with excuses and defending errant judges than they do improving functionality.

      Tuter has not made it any better and if anything is just another glaring disappointment in a long line of incompetent administrators.

      Until something is done to bust up this club mentality, we will unfortunately see more of the same with even more Broward Judges facing the music through Judicial Complaints despite the cover provided by our Chief Judge.

      Judges should be independent and not part of The Herd Mentality with a Chief Judge that is clearly not capable or interested in cleaning up the myriad of problems facing this Circuit as he is in accepting awards and honoring himself. But that would be too selfless an effort to expect.

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        Or could Judge Tuter go to a neighboring county and shadow the Chief Judge there for a few weeks? This might be the answer.

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          Its not a bad idea. If there was respect for the head banana then all of them (the Judges Clerk etc al) wouldn’t constantly be acting silly.

  8. 6

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    Palm Beach? We buy, sell and trade little people.
    If anyone sheds light, we use fake police reports to that stigmatizes, and criminalizes to discredit whistle-blowers.

    Brady violations accepted here.

  9. 'Some People Are Just Diabolical': Florida Judges Get Candid About Being 'Goaded' South Florida judges provide a rare glimpse into what it's like to preside over emotional and contentious cases while keeping a cool head. says:

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    South Florida judges provide a rare glimpse into what it’s like to preside over emotional and contentious cases while keeping a cool head.
    By Raychel Lean | February 28, 2020 at 10:00 AM

    When Brevard Circuit Judge Robin Lemonidis was publicly reprimanded for losing her temper in trial, and using a sentencing colloquy to tell a defendant she hoped he’d have to fight for his life in prison, former Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Ronald Dresnick felt a pang of sympathy.

    “I felt pretty sorry for the judge involved, because I’ve been there and I know how easy it is to say something which would be viewed as inappropriate, just because your emotions are boiling,” Dresnick said.

    Dresnick—now a partner at Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine in Miami—said he tried not to use gavels after once banging his down so hard in a murder case that it broke.

    “There are so many times you say something, and as you’re saying it, you wish you could grab those words and bring them back,” Dresnick said. “But you can’t.”

    Broward Circuit Judge Dennis Bailey can relate.

    He was reprimanded in 2019 for losing his temper in a felony criminal trial—something he feels happened because he underestimated the personal toll it would take to handle four death penalty cases in two years—two of which came back-to-back.

    Midway through one murder case, Bailey said he’d promised the husband of a murdered woman, frustrated by years of delay, that he’d get to that trial immediately after it.
    But in hindsight, that was a mistake.

    “I was mentally exhausted at the conclusion of those cases and did not handle situations as well as I should have,” Bailey said. “I learned from that lesson and would never do that again.”

    Bailey said he’s found that taking time to decompress after difficult and emotional cases is crucial.

    “When you’re having a case that you know every word is going to be analyzed and every ruling is going to be taken up on appeal, such as a death penalty case, you’re on the edge of your seat all day, every day. And if the trial goes on for two, three weeks, that’s where the stress builds up,” Bailey said. “Don’t let yourself linger in the hot seat, so to speak. Take a break, go back and do the research, and make sure you’re comfortable with your decision, instead of just shooting from the hip.”

    A recent study by the American Bar Association’s Commission on Lawyers Assistance Programs revealed that Dresnick and Bailey are far from alone, as many jurists reported experiencing high blood pressure, insomnia, stress and other health issues. The National Center for State Courts’ judicial stress resource guide has also pinpointed connections between budget cuts and low morale, obesity and judicial stress.

    And it’s no surprise, given the high stakes. Presiding over a criminal case, for instance, could mean taking away someone’s life and liberty, while civil litigation could ruin a business, and a family case might separate parents from their children.

    Trying to get judges recused

    Wearing a black robe means being tested all the time—and rightly so, since judges sit on the bench to deliver justice.

    But sometimes, in Dresnick’s experience, wearing the robe also means being “goaded” by lawyers.

    “It took me four, five years just to learn how to cope with attorneys. I’ve seen attorneys try to just take a judge off just by doing some really outrageous things, and trying to get the judge to lose their temper so they can get that judge recused,” Dresnick said. ”It happens all the time, and some people are just diabolical in the way they act, just to get the judge to make a mistake like that.”

    Where sentencing’s concerned, the best practice is not to comment on the crime at all.

    “If you sentence somebody to life, what else do you have to say?” Dresnick said. “You don’t need to show how much power you have. In fact, by not saying anything, you’re probably demonstrating more what your power is, than when you do say something.”

    ‘I’ve just signed your death warrant’
    That issue arose from comments Ingham Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina made during the Michigan sentencing hearing of former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, convicted of sexually abusing dozens of girls.

    The judge’s words provoked uproar from Nassar’s attorneys.

    Before handing down the prison sentence, Aquilina told Nassar, “I wouldn’t send my dogs to you, sir,” calling him evil and remarking, “I’ve just signed your death warrant.”

    Nassar’s attorneys claimed the judge’s comments were biased and led to a prison attack on Nassar.

    Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Nushin Sayfie, who also serves on the Florida Bar’s mental health and wellness committee, says case law shows judges tend to get in trouble when they inject their opinions into sentencing.

    “The best practices are really just to state the sentence and move on,” Sayfie said.

    The most isolating aspect of judicial life, in Sayfie’s view, comes when rulings are misunderstood or taken out of context, either because it wasn’t appropriate for the judge to elaborate, or because the media didn’t properly explain in its reporting.

    This could lead judges to agonize over how best to present a decision.

    “Unfortunately, the hard part is the next day, getting ripped apart in the newspaper, in the media, by comments in the Miami Herald,” Sayfie said. “The best way that I get through moments like that is by sharing with my colleagues. I think here in Miami, because we’re such a big circuit, the good news is we have a lot of support among our colleagues who understand.”

    Mental health support

    The Florida Bar is working on providing free and confidential online therapy sessions for all bar members, Sayfie said.

    “It’s important for judges and lawyers to feel that if they’re having a mental health issue, or if they’re facing a time in their lives where there’s more stress than others, [that] it’s OK. It’s normal, and it’s acceptable to ask for help,” Sayfie said. ”It’s acceptable to get support, and they shouldn’t fear repercussions from the court and their colleagues.”

    Chief Broward Circuit Judge Jack Tuter noted that judges not only have to make important and impartial decisions but also deal with daily emergencies that crop up in already-heavy dockets. He urged judges to seek relief through the Florida Judicial Wellness Program.

    “Judges are taught to leave the bench, or take a break if faced with a particularly difficult situation. This will help the judge regain his/her thoughts, and hopefully prevent saying something in haste,” Tuter said. “Because it is such an isolated occupation, judges frequently call on each other to discuss and deal with stressful situations and cases.”

    For Bailey, DUI manslaughter cases are heart wrenching, particularly when a child has been killed, as the defendant is frequently not “a bad person.”

    “It’s hard sometimes for a judge to keep a dry eye, when you hear the victim’s pain and anguish when they address the person who killed their child, [describe] how much they’ve destroyed their lives, and you hear the family of the person who’s being sentenced,” Bailey said. “Their loved one is now going off to prison for however many years, and they’ve done anything wrong in their life.”

    In addition to judicial conferences and training sessions, which teach judges to recognize what triggers them and to take a recess when it happens, Dresnick says visiting other judge’s courtrooms is invaluable.

    “You see somebody who’s a good judge, and you watch the way they handle a situation you were in. And you might hear them and say, ‘That’s really interesting, I’m going to try that,’ but nobody seems to have enough time,” Dresnick said.

    Though the judicial canons say judges must avoid even the appearance of impropriety, not showing enough humanity can be harmful too, according to Dresnick. He said Judge Lance Ito’s handling of O.J. Simpson’s infamous murder trial is a good example.

    “He just went out of his way not to say anything at all. He was trying so hard to maintain a certain stoicism that I thought was not helpful. Judges aren’t computers, and they really shouldn’t be,” Dresnick said. “I don’t like to just see this robotic reaction to things. I like the human factor, but I think the judges that are expressing the human factor need to be cognizant of the way it’s going to read in tomorrow’s DBR.”

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      Bye, bye Bren. Looks like you can’t raise enough money to host a single fish fry.
      You’ve been listening to the wrong people and the party looks like its over before it even began.
      It would have been one thing if you had ever done anything to improve the deplorable condition of the clerks office, but you’ve made it far worse than it ever was.
      And the way you got there .. suffice it to say it was a circus with the act getting real old every time you thru another tantrum.

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        We all believe we’re the hero of our own stories. As far as Backman is concerned, he’s sucked at it long enough. Both he and his wife.
        Although I agree with his take on Brenda Forman, I don’t agree with him slurping back in his desire to become the next Clerk of Courts.
        I don’t think he would do any better than B. Forman and she stinks.
        Backman tried to get his kid a judgeship before the kid whimped out after declaring a run. Just how many members of his immediate family have to slurp on the public dole?
        I didn’t think much of him as a Broward judge and think he’d do even a worse job as Clerk.

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      She’s done already and has nobody to blame but herself. Watch her pull the race card when its all over. The Clerk’s Office is a total mess even by Broward Standards…

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    JUDGE BACKMAN IS RIGHT

    BROWARD DESERVES MORE THAN A HISSY FIT CLERK

  11. 9

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    You sort of got to feel sorry for poor Bren. She slurped her way into it and is now facing the blowback with at least two of those running against her being some of the biggest political sleaze bags in the game: Backman and the other Forman.
    She’s going to get it snatched away from her pretty big time when they start with the public schmear.

  12. 13

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    Backman is a pure POS, now and when he was CJ and in charge of overseeing the honesty and integrity of all Judges’ conduct as well as the Integrity of the Broward Court/Judicial System–he failed–for example, he specifically allowed Gardiner to continue collude with Raft to intentionally delay a postconviction motion, process and procedures from even happening and simply refused to even respond to a compliant if this misconduct deliberately obstructing even procedural due process from happening. if you elect shit, you get shit back. Caveat emptor, voters.

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    Our Clerk is a mess.

    Our State Attorney is 80 yrs old.

    Mr. Finkelstein has checked out.

    With Finkelstein gone all eyes are on Judge Tuter as the default leader of the courts.

    Does he have a plan for Corona Virus?

    Are Skype systems in place?

    Are secure communications ensured for Constitutional functions to remain operable if mass quarantines become necessity?

    What if court is cancelled en masse?

    What precludes illegal detentions?

    How will the public be protected?

    Will Mr. Finkelstein step back into the fray to lead Broward courts once agin in time of crisis?

    He is needed.

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    Those people who are against the US Constitution are not Americans.
    They are Communist enemies within.
    The current Florida Bar are a cabal unto themselves.

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